Posted by: luisginillo | April 22, 2013

Cala Marcarella

On the morning of the 19th we sailed for two hours to the beautiful bay of Carla Marcarella, where Boris and Christian set about testing their lobster trap mechanisms. The setup involves a welded metal surround for the lobster trap, a lighting device and a high definition camera. The camera takes footage from a separate pyramidal cage, which is attached by ropes to float just above the trap. By equipping the camera with extra battery packs and setting the camera to take one photo every 10 seconds the camera can film for over 40 hours.

The following morning we sailed out of the bay to meet KAI’s sister ship: the Toftevaag, a 103 year old Norwegian fishing boat expertly restored and a flagship boat for marine conservation and expeditions in the Mediterranean. That afternoon we met with Pedro, a local fisherman, who is a keen leader of sustainable lobster catching in the area to test the lobster trap camera device. Pedro has previously made several modifications to his traps to improve their efficiency and limit bycatch. The collaboration allows Pedro to accurately see the behaviour of the lobsters reacting in the traps. On Saturday evening we successfully launched a trap for two hours and after recovery, Boris and Christian were to make any final adjustments before they launch the trap for the full 40 hours.

Christian and Boris attaching the camera to the lobster trap surround.

Christian and Boris attaching the camera to the pyramidal surround, which is attached by ropes to the lobster trap and will float just above it.

Christian adjusting the camera prior to the first test in Cara Marcarella.

Christian adjusting the camera prior to the first test in Cala Marcarella.

The Luis Ginillo in the beautiful bay of Cara Marcarella.

The Luis Ginillo in the beautiful bay of Cala Marcarella.

Victor, now taking charge of the Toftevaag, doing maintenance and painting.

Victor, now taking charge of the Toftevaag, doing maintenance and painting.

Using the crane to release the lobster trap with camera and light attachment off the port side of the Luis Ginillo on Saturday evening.

Using the crane to release the lobster trap off the port side of the Luis Ginillo on Saturday evening.

Christian and Boris work from the RIB to slowly lower the trap to the sea floor and secure a buoy and light to float above so that we can find and collect the trap in two hours time.

Christian and Boris work from the RIB to slowly lower the trap to the sea floor and secure a buoy and light to float above so that we can find and collect the trap in two hours time.

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